Water Areobics for Health

What is Water Aerobics? 
Water aerobics uses both the buoyancy and resistance of water to raise participants' heart rates while protecting their joints from the impact produced when exercising on land. Exercising in the water offers an intense cardiovascular challenge with significant strength training benefits. Deep water aerobics is a particular type of water fitness that can help anyone, even elite athletes, stay in shape.

Deep water aerobics is a cardiovascular exercise performed in water deep enough so that you do not come in contact with the bottom of the pool. A flotation device, such as a buoyancy belt or pool noodle, is usually used to free your hands and legs to perform large movements against the resistance of the water. Some moves commonly done in deep water aerobics classes include jumping jacks, knee tucks and scissors.

History of water aerobics
Decades after the swim queen Esther Williams performed choreographed swim duets with Johnny Weismuller -- the original Tarzan --, water aerobics went mainstream as a form of exercise. In the 1950s, fitness guru Jack LaLanne developed a program of aerobic exercise that was the focal point of his television show, "The Jack LaLanne Show." In addition to introducing a number of land-based exercises and machines to the world, LaLanne, who died in 2011 at 96, developed exercises that could be performed in the water to relieve the pressure and strain of gravity.2. 

Misconceptions
Water-based classes get a bad rap for being easy and for old ladies. If you apply the same intensity that you apply to your land-based class, you will may be surprised at how challenged you feel. The water changes movement and makes everything harder--applying 12 to 14 times more resistance against the muscles. 

Benefits
A 150-lb. person can burn about 200 calories in a typical 45-minute water aerobic class. The exercises are designed to raise your heart rate and strengthen a number of muscles, including your biceps, triceps, quadriceps and hamstrings. Water's buoyancy also supports joints, allowing freedom of movement, which can prevent stiffness and soreness. 
    Shallow Water Aerobics: 
*Helps build cardiovascular endurance without the impact of a floor-based class
*Water reduces the stress you put on your joints by about 90 percent
*Significantly overweight people benefit from water classes because they can burn calories without putting tremendous stress on their bodies. 
    Deep water aerobics: 
* Helps those with arthritis or joint injuries achieve a cardiovascular workout. 
* Water provides about 12 to 14 times more resistance than air, helping you to build muscular endurance during your routine without building bulk from weights. 
* Deep water aerobics improves flexibility and circulation and really works your core muscles

Go as deep as you can in the pool and make class even more difficult in terms of balance and coordination.

Considerations
Consider incorporating a water aerobics class as cross training to help you beat boredom and overuse injuries. Recognize that your heart rate registers lower in the water, so it is important to use perceived exertion to determine the intensity of your workout. If you have sensitivities to the chemicals used in pools, seek out saltwater pools--many facilities offer them. Water shoes can help enhance your workout by providing you a better grip on the pool floor.


References
Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/325714-what-is-deep-water-aerobics/#ixzz28GVN1zd7
Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/420463-history-of-water-aerobics/#ixzz28GUSf8pP
Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/325714-what-is-deep-water-aerobics/#ixzz28GUdTk6g
References
University of New Mexico; The History of Fitness; Lance C. Dalleck, et al.
Find Sports Now: Water Aerobics
Penfield Fitness and Raquet Club: Aquafit Classes
"New York Daily News"; Jack LaLanne, fitness icon, dead at 96; Lauren Johnston; Jan. 2011
Official Esther Williams: Biography
Arthritis Foundation: Water Exercise

•  American Council on Exercise: Making a Splash with Water Fitness
•  United States Water Fitness Association: Information Regarding Water Exercise

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Tiffany Rivera